Simply 6 Minutes – Quelle Horreur

#simply6minutes #gymhorror

Simply 6 Minutes – 22Sept2020

Nausea rises!

It does not compute that I am back in a school gym.

All those years of forced comradery. Forced athleticism.

I was no kind of gym junkie. Jock. Cheerleader.

Get me out of here, was top of my playlist.

The smell as you enter so reluctantly, brings it all back.

Gym sweat, gym gear, peer crushing, humiliation, bullying.

Not for me memories of past triumphs. Game night. Winners!

For me it is the little guy, the loser, the nerd.

Now as a parent, I find myself here with forced smile and bonhomie.

Supporting a child who also does not fit. Who does not want to be here.

I feel huge guilt and pressure. As a parent, I need to encourage team spirit. Love of the game.

As a person, I hate it all. I need to take my son’s hand and walk away. From the expectation.

What’s wrong with loving your own company, reading, gaming, talking long walks in the country.

In the name of ‘team’ we ask for ‘sheep’ ‘same’ ‘blend’ ‘belong’ – internally, I cry ‘ONE’ ‘ME’ ‘ALONE’.

How much of this do I reflect back onto my child. How much of it is his own identity?

I don’t  know, but I don’t think I assume and turn that pressure onto him.

I think he’s his own person – and I encourage that.

Then I get the summons. Game night. Assembly. Presentation night.

And numbly we enter, dragging our feet, heads down, breath held.

And into the dark past we trudge.

https://christinebialczak.com/2020/07/14/simply-6-minutes-writing-challenge

  1. Set up a timer or sit near a clock so you can keep track of the six minutes you will be writing.
  2. You can either use one of the prompts (photo or written) or you can free-write.
  3. Get ready and write for 6 minutes, that is it! Can you write a complete story? Can you think of a new Sonnet? Can you write 400 words? 400? 500? There are no restrictions on what kind of writing you do, but you should try to be actively writing for six minutes.
  4. After you are done writing, include your word count and then post back to this page #Simply6Minutes or include your link in the comments section. Pingbacks are enabled.

Friday Fictioneers – the Mother in Law

Photo Prompt @ Dale Rogerson

She knew when I arrived today it would be dark; the light broken.
I always knock; I never buzz.
Is it a lark, or deadly intent? The doorknocker from hell.
An allergic reaction could be the end of me.
I don’t know why she hates me. Perhaps I’ve joked too often when partaking at her table.
My comments could be softened.
Blasted woman. I’ve tolerated much. Too many words, embittered. Too much emotion, littered upon the plate she offers.
Her daughter treasures me. Grandchildren dote on her every word. BUT, mother-in-law today, I see, has finally had enough of me! (100 words)

Fibbing Friday 18th September 2020

New to this challenge … so here I go!

  1. What exactly is Yorkshire pudding?

A rotund young man from Yorkshire.

  1. What is treacle, and why do people make tarts out of it?

Treacle is that bitingly sarcastic ‘thank you’ offered to one of the ‘Happy Friday’ crowd, as you hand them a sharply sticky (sugar free) apple pastry; also known as tart.

  1. What is the key ingredient of haggis?

Ground up old mother-in-law (of the unfriendly kind only).

  1. How is toffee made?

You get a toff …. And go for it!

  1. How did pound cake get its name?

One day a virtuous nutritionist, realising that sugar in the form of cake was detrimental to waistlines everywhere, tried to change mindsets by putting a negative name on to a cake. Good luck with that one!

  1. Why is candy corn so named?

I believe the name derives from the Dentists of America Association, who believe candy shaped like teeth (aka Oompa Loompa candy in the trade) will:
a) bring them more clients or at the very least
b) discourage people from eating the candy corn

  1. What is marzipan?

A mad hatter who has run out of hats; therefore, pans.

  1. Why is a baker’s dozen so named?

Originally, bakers were notoriously bad at addition and so in the early days, a baker’s dozen just meant ‘quite a lot’. Over time, they settled amicably on a true number.

  1. What is meant by the idiom, “Too many cooks spoil the pot”?

Well, when brewing a batch of marijuana, one needs to keep ones wits about one. And therefore if there is more than one, and one is ‘wired’ it just doesn’t work – and the pot may well blacken.

  1. What is meant by the idiom, “What’s sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander”?

Sauce isn’t gender biased and currently enjoying a surge in popularity.

I am woman

I had a work teleconference to attend this afternoon, but as I’ve effectively had a panic attack and am full of anxiety, I sent in my apologies. And while eating my late lunch, I jumped on to one of the news sites I follow and read this headline –

‘JK Rowling’s career declared ‘dead’ via #RIPJKRowling hashtag’.

I knew immediately that this would be about her position and comments on transgenders (and other such things) on the day that her latest book is published. You may not be aware that JK Rowling has expressed opinions (via Twitter) over recent times about transgenders (and other things) that has caused lots of negative and angry reaction. It just so happens that:

  1. I’ve recently been thinking a lot about how people can’t take a contrary position on transgenders (or make any kind of comment that is not immediately supportive) without being judged harshly and condemned.
    This could also be true of taking a position on black matters if you’re white, police matters if you’re black or a criminal, white matters if you’re black (or a white idiot, supporting black matters to the point where you’re rejecting your whiteness), First Nations if you’re from a long line of colonials, or white, etc and so forth and so on!
  2. I picked up the latest Cormoran Strike book this morning (JK writes this series as Robert Galbraith). Apparently (I haven’t read the book yet) there is a ‘male’ transvestite serial killer. Oh no!
  3. And of course, the world has gone crazy and you can’t possibly suggest that a transvestite could be a serial killer – especially if we suspect that you are against transgenders (even though I understand that a transvestite is a person who enjoys cross-dressing and is not necessarily a transgender; who is a person with a gender identity different to their gender at birth).

What has happened to it being okay to hold an opposing opinion? JK Rowling and some of her contemporaries express this as the intolerance of opposing views. A link to a letter shared in Harper’s magazine in July 2020 is here. I have pulled out some of the phrases and declarations that jumped out at me:

  • The free exchange of information and ideas, the lifeblood of a liberal society, is daily becoming more constricted.
  • … spreading more widely in our culture is … an intolerance of opposing views, a vogue for public shaming and ostracism, and the tendency to dissolve complex policy issues in a blinding moral certainty.
  • We uphold the value of robust and even caustic counter-speech from all quarters.
  • … the result has been to steadily narrow the boundaries of what can be said without the threat of reprisal.
  • We are already paying the price in greater risk aversion among writers, artists, and journalists who fear for their livelihoods if they depart from the consensus, or even lack sufficient zeal in agreement.
  • This stifling atmosphere will ultimately harm the most vital causes of our time.
  • The restriction of debate …. invariably hurts those who lack power and makes everyone less capable of democratic participation.
  • We refuse any false choice between justice and freedom, which cannot exist without each other.
  • … we need a culture that leaves us room for experimentation, risk taking, and even mistakes.
  • We need to preserve the possibility of good-faith disagreement …

I’ve read several articles that discuss the position and comments that JK has made, and it seems to me that she is being quite reasonable. But in the cancel culture we currently inhabit, it is almost impossible to speak against any of the current trends and alternate lifestyle positions (I didn’t say ‘choices) without being harshly judged and vilified.

It is quite helpful for me to have access to this letter because it helps me present to you snippets of somebody else’s word explanations for the feelings I’m trying to express. And as a writer in a writing community here on WordPress, a cancel culture impinges on my ability to express myself and my thoughts, and have open debate and conversation.

I am a white, middle-aged woman whose husband earns a good living and the pressure has been off me to reciprocate in the financial sphere. I have been extremely lucky. Therefore (apparently) it seems that I am not allowed any opinion on anything or anybody else, because ‘who am I to talk’?

I’ve an almost guaranteed freedom of movement and safety just because of who I am, barring the standard risk of accident, home invasion, or visitor of the murderous persuasion.

But, I’m also in a perfect situation to be an avid observer of the world. Through listening, watching news programs, following social commentary, interacting in my community and above all – reading; I get to see things and hear things from a stand-off position that allows me some understanding of things, without having to live it. In fact, having to live things can close you off to other possibilities and opinions, because you are in fact living it.

My observation is that JK Rowling and others aren’t saying it is wrong to be transgender. She has expressed concern at the large numbers of very young people showing a desire to transition – where has it come from, has it been pushed on them? People who feel lost and don’t know where they fit look to popular culture, and aspire to what seems the surest way to be loved and accepted. Being transgender could be perceived as trendy, and if you’ve uncertainty about your sexual identify, perhaps transitioning could seem like the way to go.

People arguing against the prevalence of transitioning are asking ‘has the right decision been made for this person? Is it being made for the right reason? Were there other alternatives. And in a society where support, support, support seems to be the creed – don’t ever suggest that somebody cannot  – it is important to be able to say that the decision to transition is by true definition ‘life changing’ and to be undertaken carefully.

And here I clumsily interject as an example; look at the overuse and prevalence of Ritalin and other amphetamine type drugs administered to a generation of children unnecessarily. Dare I compare?

I do feel bamboozled by all the changes in society. The idealism about rights, the bombardment and intensity of expression about wants, needs, rights. What we used to think of as minority groups (and I’m not talking black people) have such loud voices and the platform now – that they are disallowing the rest of us to have or express a contrary opinion. They want to disallow me to identify as a woman and a mother as per the most base definition. A woman bleeds, gives birth, marries a man (if that is her choice). She is the feminine parallel to man. I have absolutely no problem accepting all the different types and ways of being in this world.

I don’t want to be identified as cisgender, because you want to be labelled as ‘across/other’, you want me to be labelled as ‘same as’.

I am a woman; don’t cancel me out. And, don’t cancel my right to voice.

Friday Fictioneers – Blue

Wilmington

Photo Prompt by Rochelle

It hasn’t changed. I quietly weep.

If I waited for another five minutes, I swear dad would come through that glass paned door.

In standard heavy work boot clad feet, deep blue denim shirt, with his darkly tanned and leathered skin and bright dazzling smile. He’d push his way out, full of enthusiasm for the day.

With Bluey, his faithful Beagle leading the way.

What a team. Full of love. Inseparable. Friends for life.

And death.

Daddy died in a site accident, timber crushing his strong body.

Bluey dug desperately, for hours.

Then pined away; succumbing to heartbreak. (98 words)

Friday fictioneers is a weekly challenge set by Rochelle Wisoff Fields to write a story in response to a photo prompt – in 100 words or less. You can find other stories here.

Liebster Award Nomination 2020

smily-thumbs-up
THANK YOU Snoopy M for nominating my blog for Liebstar Award 2020. That was a huge surprise and most welcome! I’m such a newbie blogger 😊

The Liebstar Award is a way to be discovered but also to connect and support the blogging community. A great idea in promoting your own blog and others. Originally it was given out to blogs with less than 2000 readers, but this has slowly lowed as the reward has gained popularity. It is now only 200 readers or less. It’s really an arbitrary number. If you like helping other blogs out go ahead and do it regardless of its size. This award is all about promoting and viewing other people’s blogs. (Taken from https://theglobalaussie.com/the-liebster-award/)

RULES :

  1. Thank the blogger who nominated you and provide a link to their blog
  2. Answer the 11 questions given to you
  3. Nominate 11 bloggers
  4. Ask your nominees 11 questions
  5. Notify your nominees once you have uploaded your post

Snoopy M set me the following tricky questions.

  1. Name one thing/person that/who makes your life complete (or would have made complete).
    My husband Eric. Somehow we found each other. I was already married, and we had only just broken up (he had moved out) and then into my workplace walked Eric. Within 6 months we were engaged. My divorce came through a year later (in October) and we married in November. We will be married 30 years in 2021.
  2. Did the pandemic bring any positive change inside you?
    I’m not too sure of that. Like many people, I had aspirations I guess of what would be achieved now that we had time and space. But really, I just ate more! I wish I could say I’d grown, more than just in waist size 😉
  3. How do you intend to grow your blog further? 
    I write the most when I’m travelling, which my husband and I love to do. Otherwise, I participate in weekly short story writes, where someone posts a photo or word prompt. I do have two works in progress (novels) and in the back of my mind, my blog is making my ‘literary contacts’, in case I’m ever published. While also collecting a bunch of like minded friends from around the world.
  4. Which is your favourite corner in the house?
    We only have a small house, and I do love our living room. Our sofas are a groovy lime green, my bookshelves are there, and it is the room where I have indoor plants. Also, the television is there, and as I love movies, it finishes off my favourite space.
  5. Love at first sight – Does any such thing really exist? What is your opinion?
    I think love at first sight does exist. I was very aware of my husband almost immediately I met him in my workplace. At the time, I wouldn’t have articulated that I’d fallen in love, but in hindsight it seems obvious.
  6. Mac Book Pages or Microsoft Word – which one do you prefer more?
    Microsoft Word – but only because that is what my workplaces have always used, and it has become normal for me.
  7. Do you know anyone (including yourself) who has used all the features offered by the iPhones till date?
    I don’t use an iPhone. If you include Android phones such as Samsung, I think I use many of the features. I’m fairly tech savvy for an oldie!
  8. Which social media platform do you think is more popular in 2020 – Facebook/ Instagram/Twitter? (you can add any other social media platform if you want)
    Apparently, only oldies such as Mums and Dads use Facebook. Is that currently accurate? Twitter is very popular. Instagram has had a resurgence, perhaps because you can do ‘live’ events on them now?
  9. What do you think about India as a nation? Have you ever tasted Indian food?
    I have never travelled to India. I do enjoy Indian food; it is my daughter’s food of choice when we have a celebration. It has been on my travel wish list to visit India, while at the same time I think I’ll be overwhelmed by the sheer number of people there. And the poverty. Although that might be a personal misconception.
  10. Who is all you all-time favourite author? Please specify the genre.
    All-time favourite author is tough, you know. As we are all writers, I’m assuming we’re all readers and who has only one favourite? I’ll choose my long-time favourite Stephen King, horror author extraordinaire! I’m a little embarrassed that it is not a more literary writer, but I’ve grown with him.
  11. When was the last time you received a compliment from someone and what was that?
    Just today. I volunteer as a tech operator and reader on Vision Australia radio. It’s not commercial radio. Not like talk back. You don’t need to have a bubbly or loud personality! We read the local newspaper for vision impaired listeners. It makes local community news more accessible to them.
    Someone on our radio committee called me today and said I was one of their best on-air readers – so that was very ‘WOW’!

My questions to the nominees :

  1. How long have you been blogging?
  2. What is your favourite writing genre?
  3. Have you previously been nominated for a blogging award?
  4. Where have you travelled to and what is your favourite country / culture?
  5. Do you have a bucket list?
  6. What has been your biggest triumph?
  7. What has been your lowest moment?
  8. How has the Covid-19 pandemic affected your life?
  9. What do you think of Donald Trump?
  10. Name your favourite memory of your hometown.
  11. Do you believe in a spiritual deity / higher power?

And I nominate :

Michael Humphris

Paula Stevenson Writer

The Road Back to Life

Our Literary Journey

Keith’s Ramblings

Notes to Women

Neil MacDonald Author

Tannille

Sound Bite Fiction

Jibber Jabber with Sue

Living Authors’ Society

I tried to choose blogs I follow that have 200 or below followers, but that was too difficult. And so two or three of these are below 1,000 followers. I enjoy reading all your words and hope you are happy with this nomination.

Who won the week – Daniel Andrews MP

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews is doing an amazing job during the Covid-19 crisis.

Australia-wide, our politicians have served the country well. Up until early July, it seemed we had everything under control. And then it became serious in Melbourne, Victoria.

Every day, Mr Andrews has to front the media. He has to present the ‘bad news of the day’ – while guiding, inspiring and sometimes – chastising us.

He appears to be more tired each time we see him – and no wonder! I bet he doesn’t switch off by 8pm to watch Netflix! And when did he last get a chance to sit with the newest blockbuster novel?

In this time of weaponized word bites, it is very easy for us to complain. And not everything has been done right. But as has been said for the last seven months – these are unprecedented times. And unprecedented means acknowledging that we and our politicians are learning a lot ‘on the job’ and ‘in real time’.

So, hats off to Mr Daniel Andrews. Keep going. Love to you and your family.

Thank you. 

My contribution to Fandango’s “Who Won The Week” #FWWTW – politician Mr Daniel Andrews MP.

Gidget Glamper – update

Some of my friends will know that as of late 2017 early 2018, our Gidget camper dream was blown apart! The company went into receivership.

Along with a couple of hundred other customers in Australia and the US we paid a deposit (for most 40% and for some, full price) with an expectation of delivery within 6 months (promised in a conversation on Facebook). We paid our deposit on 29 August 2016 and by August 2017 we’d requested refund of deposit, due to unreasonable time taken to provide product and still no completion date. In September 2017, we received an email effectively saying ‘your refund is approved, just waiting on timeline. Then in October, after conversations where they asked me to keep the order with them, we received an email promising return of refund over 4 monthly payments.

Then in early November, when no refund payments had been received, we got to speak with one of the Directors, Glenn, who carried on about how hard done by he was, ‘give us 6 weeks’ (December) and we’ll have all refunds sorted out’.

Nothing by December and eventually by the 18th December we had an email from Glenn apologising for delays, a rehash of all their dramas so far and a promise of all refunds by January 2018.

Next email advice was 11th January advising temporary closure of factory due to inability to pay wages, and on the same day an email from the administrator advising that Gidget was going into voluntary administration.

So as we’d all begun to suspect, Glenn on behalf of Gidget was full of shit. All our suspicions came to be true.

At some point in the above, Glenn began to ask new and existing customer orders if they wanted to pay in full and be moved to the top of the queue, because things were taking too long and at least they’d get their Gidget sooner than everyone else.

Well, that really rang alarm bells with us and anybody who decided to pay in full were even more gullible than us.

I have to say, I followed the Gidget story from the beginning. I found a YouTube video showing the delights of the camper and the ease of use, the compactfulness. The accessories. The beautiful installed kitchen. The finishings. It was retro, compact and amazing. I didn’t want to drag a caravan around Australia on our long weekend treats. We didn’t want to buy a much larger car in order to be able to drag our holiday home behind us.

I understood that the video enabled an extremely intense and rapid interest to be expressed in the product, with unprecedented orders coming in. They had made perhaps 3 campers to that point and needed to set up the factory process to manufacture mass (but still custom and handmade) product.

I believed when they said that the person they brought in to transform their manufacturing process had let them down, at great cost for no resolution.

It seemed feasible that the money they had received was being spent on upgrading their processes.

But they weren’t taking care with the deposits, which (just as in real estate) should have been put away into a safe, untouchable account that was contribution toward an end product. A promise from the client that allowed them to build with confidence in a buying market.

They abused this and ran up debts of millions. With no resources behind them, they were unable to pay back any creditors.

It was very disappointing for us. But you know, not the end of the world. I still believe that they had the best of intentions and a dream at the beginning. It got out of control, they dug a bigger hole for themselves, and began to do things the wrong way in the hope that things would turn around.

If they weren’t that innocent, then I’m sure they’ve ended up not very happy in their life.

Well, I haven’t been on to my blog site for quite a while and thought maybe I’d update this.

Cheers, Trish (August 2019)

Death of the brick and mortar store

Once upon a time, I was a retail store owner – operator of a brick and mortar bookshop. It was a labour of love for this book tragic!

The Australian Booksellers Association doesn’t consider an independent bookshop viable in a town whose population is approximately 5,000. Our town was the regional centre for up to 15,000 people; but that was still considered a challenge.

I continued to work part-time with my husband in our Farm Management Advisory business, while working full-time in the bookshop. Usually, I employed one other staff member for Saturdays and occasional backup – but unless I was out of town or on holidays you would find me at the bookshop.

I didn’t take a salary. I did buy a lot of books at cost price. So many books came across my counter that it was irresistible!

I loved that shop! So did the town, my kids and my husband. We only ran it for five years, with a stock turnover goal of three to four times a year. Annual turnover grew from $80,000 in Year 1 to $250,000 in Year 5.

There are many ways to measure success in business – and I guess No. 1 would be profit. Because why else are you in business? Otherwise, it eats into funds available to you and your family. And our children were still young enough that every cent counted.

My husband was making a good living and the bookshop met its own costs, provided a welcome service to the town, employment for one other person – and I was in heaven!

That is a success story to me!

Since that experience, I’ve had a hyper-awareness (particularly around Christmas) of the stresses and pressures that retailers face. I feel it in my heart as I observe the ebb and flow, comings and goings of retail business around me.

Take a moment yourself to notice and sympathise amid your Christmas retail splurge. See the shops that are rocking it? There are many people browsing or queuing; overwhelmed staff tending to urgent and often impatient customers.

But at the end of the day, there is satisfaction. Sales are up, wages and overheads covered, and perhaps there’s a profit. They haven’t overstocked but stocked enough. Another Christmas survived; perhaps another to look forward to.

Now take a 360 degree look around the mall, arcade or high street you’re standing in. How many other shops can you see that are quiet? I don’t know why they’re quieter; perhaps it is just that they’ve a niche market. Maybe their product isn’t the current fashion.

Perhaps, Christmas is not their season to shine.

How have they marketed? Do they present in an appealing way? Is there enough stock, offering the abundance of choice we all expect and demand?

Are these businesses just tired and can’t find the juice to work at it anymore?

In retail, the need to earn your big bucks at seasonal times, Christmas, Valentine’s Day, Easter, mother and father days to name some – and the abundance of choice we now have and expect – have lead to the demise of the retail specialist. In my opinion.

We need more reasons nowadays to give a storefront retailer our attention and they need our business, more and more.

Giving ‘added value’ can be a winner for the business and a welcome draw for the customer. Done well!

Think books and chocolates; and book lights, bookmarks, book bean bags, audio books, tv tie-in products, stationery! Behold, budding author; notebooks!

For a bookshop, all these products add to the book experience – reading, writing, comfort, enjoyment and relevancy. Still specialists, but adding value for the customer, with more reasons for us to enter the store, stick around and buy.

When done badly though, it can be too confusing. Something in the window draws your attention, but when you scan it seems there’s no continuity or consistency. Lack of a clear theme can be straight up off-putting. Do you even bother to enter.

If you do, try asking a question about or around that product. Chances are that the salesperson doesn’t know anything past the price, what they have in stock and whether they can order more. They won’t be able to engage much deeper than that, or promise anything else.

A good bookshop, however, with the right tools can really connect with you over that book, or author. How many books has that author written, and in what format? The due date of his next novel might already be in the system. The salesperson may also be able to tell you if the wholesaler still has stock and how many; yes, tools can be that good!

Somebody on the staff will enthuse with you about the author or the book itself. They’ll introduce you to other authors that you may enjoy, based on this one purchase. And they could set you on the path to a heavenly journey of years duration with somebody new.

If they’re a quality specialist bookshop. You won’t have this experience with a Target or Kmart store, you can be sure of that; on any product.

I would caution you though. However good your bookshop is – don’t expect too much extra engagement with staff in the week leading up to Christmas. They are exhausted, they are pulling their hair out, they’ve had too many negative experiences already to even face the good customer, and they just plain don’t have time! 😊

I have digressed.

I personally see those empty, quieter shops and I feel for them. Imagine them watching all the flowing traffic passing them by into competitor stores, and their hearts breaking.

Imagine, spirits lifting at footsteps, at bodies heading their way, only for their spirits to drop when the steps stop short; or walk right on by.

For a while, shops open with excitement and hope; but as the weeks go by and the time opportunity winds down, despondency sets in. The shopkeeper will either hang on longer each day hoping to catch the late shopper or will begin to close early and give up.

Come the New Year, there are now a few empty spaces in your mall, arcade or high street. Come the next Christmas season there is less competition, fewer brick and mortar stores, fewer opportunities to be tactile with your product choice, less human interaction, reduced liveliness in your mall, arcade or high street of choice.

My heart hurts as I observe the shops in my wanderings. Consumerism is not good for the soul. But it does give livelihood and meaning to the modern retail business and employment to many – especially the young and under skilled.

One day, the consumer of my generation and older will look around and miss the days when we could touch that dress, pick up that book, spray on the sample perfume – and talk to someone.

In another generation, shopping online will be the norm! And only the oldies will remember how it used to be. Another generation of the young ‘won’t get it’. They won’t understand what the fuss was about; won’t know what they’re missing.

For all that there must be positives to a total consumer market operating in the cloud, the heart and soul connection will be lost.

Okay; we can buy what we want in one million different colours, at great prices, in a speedy and convenient manner. A drone will deliver and ‘happily’ collect and return the product when it is not quite what you expected.

But at what cost to the spirit of humanity.

AND at what expense to the environment. Packaging!

What makes you laugh?

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Laughter. The simple pleasure of a belly laugh! What a physical experience it can be.

What brings on that kind of laughter for you, dear reader? Does it happen often?

It takes a lot for me to laugh out loud. I’m more of a quiet smiler. Sometimes the smile is so quiet, you could think I was unaffected. I often ‘feel’ the smile in my head and know that it isn’t showing on the outside.

Watching movies often brings out a noisy laugh. Usually over slapstick comedy. I consider slapstick as physical comedy; somebody has fallen, for example. I laugh and laugh like a sicko! There is nothing very subtle about my sense of humour 😀 I’ll find myself laughing so hard that I can’t catch my breath. Sometimes, it is scary because it seems I’ll never get it back. I think this is because I struggle to let myself be loud and my natural inclination is to stuff it back in.

Graham Norton makes me laugh. I love his show. I chuckle my way through it, up to and including the red chair! Graham is very clever at bringing his guests right along, sharing with us their unusual stories and cracking us up.

I laugh with my husband, unexpectedly. Not because I don’t expect to laugh with him, but perhaps because a moment ago life was staid. Nothing particularly outstanding was happening. And then, something is said – we’re on the same wavelength and something clicks – then we’re both bent over in raptures of laughter. Take a peek at each other and again we’re falling around. If you’re lucky enough to have that kind of bond with somebody, then you’ll understand where I’m coming from.

Naturally, I’m a very serious person. I laugh with people I can relax with. That includes my children and my sisters. There are only a few friends that I’ll find myself laughing with.

I didn’t grow up with a wider network of family. It was always Mum and Dad and my siblings. All aunties and cousins lived in another country. And so, I didn’t develop strong bonds there.

My husband and I just spent a day with a cousin and his wife. We’ve been developing friendship over the last few years, mainly via Facebook; and we visited with them in 2013. But we laughed and laughed this weekend. It was very natural and friendly; non-judgmental laughing at each other and ourselves. A lightening of spirit experience.

The endorphins released from laughing are real. You can feel the release and relaxation after a good bout of laughter. It must be why there are laughter therapy classes, why comedians are so popular and why everyone loves the Simpsons! 😀

If you’ve read this, hopefully you’ll know exactly what I’m talking about and you enjoy loud and proud laughter regularly. If you don’t get enough laughs – search it out! What makes you laugh?

I’m including a link here to something that still makes me laugh. I hope you’ll get a good chuckle out of it too.